In Memory & Honor



Ann's Hope In Honor & Memory

A part of Ann’s Hope Foundation’s mission is to remember and honor those who have battled melanoma.

If you would like to have your loved one added to our memory page or to honor a survivor, please contact us at 262.305.1370 or send us mail at: Ann’s Hope Foundation
P.O. Box 376
Hartland WI 53029.

2011 Honorary Survivor

Terry Ritter

Terry Ritter, 48, husband, and father of two children 7 and 8 years of age, is an avid outdoorsman enjoying bicycling, fishing, camping, volunteer work and international travel with his family was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma of an unknown origin in early 2011.

Since his diagnosis, he has gone through invasive surgery with successful removal, by Dr. Sharon Weber, of two large tumors, which were encapsulated in his lymph nodes. It is believed that the cancer also spread throughout his entire body on a microscopic level. Fortunately for Terry, he was in excellent health and able to participate in a Melanoma test treatment program receiving Immunotherapy by the renowned Dr. Mark Albertini of the University of Wisconsin Hospital’s Carbone Cancer Clinic.

During his treatment and recovery, Terry remained active with administrative tasks for the Madison Fire Department where he is employed as Fire Lieutenant and Paramedic. In fact, to date Terry has returned for duty to the Fire Department, been active in many aspects of emergency service again and feels great. He has worked hard through physical therapy and has since returned to cycling through the mountains of Colorado with his wife, as was once his summertime hobby.

Realizing this is a life challenge he faces now, Terry remarks that if it wasn’t with the expert care, compassion and dedication to their profession of Dr. Mark Albertini, Dr. Sharon Weber, Mary Beth Henry, Dr. George Rizner and Dr. Craig Kent all of the University of Wisconsin Hospital he may not be in such a position to have a positive influence on his family or the diverse community service he enjoys being a part of. While he accepted his diagnosis, the hardest thing for Terry was to imagine his children without a father, as he has always valued time with his family the most. He speaks often of the selfless service of a few special nurses, doctors, fire department employees and friends who all helped his children out by helping him out in any number of ways. His gratitude for their kindness and support is readily visible in his eyes, as they may appear tearful when he smiles and relays the many moments of surprised aid and support.

Terry’s fight to be with his family is not over. While he remains positive in spirit and energy, only time will tell if the test treatment aimed at killing the cancer on a microscopic level has worked. He receives scans, blood tests and exams every three months and continues to exercise and monitor his diet.

2011 Memorials

Cathy Stephan Gravelle • October 30, 1972 – June 11, 2010

The youngest of four children, Cathy (“the Munch”) was the glue of the Stephan family. Her wispy, strawberry hair and beautiful baby face captivated us from the moment she entered our lives. Despite constant doting from her adoring parents, big brothers and sister, she grew into a gracious, generous, loving and all-around-incredible woman.

Cathy spent her grade-school and high-school years in a sea of activities like gymnastics, girl scouts, ski club and the tennis team. She made friends easily, enjoyed sports and shared her infectious laugh readily and frequently. Her life bubbled with joy, friendships, and dreams. Cathy graduated from the University of Notre Dame where she studied English literature and made life-long friends who amused and adored her. Cathy earned her masters degree in elementary education from National Lewis University and taught first and second graders at St. Mary’s Elementary School in Lake Forest, Illinois and at St. Mary’s School in Elm Grove, Wisconsin. Her time spent teaching was rich with blessings, both given and received.

At a mutual friend’s wedding in 1997, Cathy met Mike Gravelle who would become her best friend and then her dear husband in July of 1999. Cathy and Mike welcomed three gorgeous, red-headed children: Madeline was born in ’01, Charlie in ’03 and J.P. in ’08. The Gravelles have loved being active and engaged members of the Shorewood, WI community.

Cathy was kind and generous and simply could not wait to contribute! It was always her pleasure to extend a helping hand to her school, her friends, her church and her neighbors. Cathy’s desire to share her gifts occasionally exceeded her capacity to produce. One could often find Cath up late at night, frosting cupcakes, tying bows or planning her next project; always with her signature special touches. Our crafty Cathy enjoyed personalizing stationary, baby announcements and holiday cards by hand. She loved to ponder paint and fabric samples when decorating her home. She joyfully ‘decked the halls’ of her home for every major (and some not-so-major) holiday! She led the children in all manner of craft projects (often inviting neighborhood children to her impromptu ‘craft-camp’). She volunteered at school and in her community. Cathy’s love for her family, her commitment to her Catholic faith and her joi de vivre was evident and contagious. She was an absolute delight.

In 2001, Cathy’s dermatologist noticed a new and different-looking mole on her back. After learning it was a single-spreading malignant melanoma, she had it removed via wide excision and was pleased to learn that the margins had been “clean”. Afterward, Cathy visited her oncologist and underwent chest x-rays routinely. Six years later, in 2007, Cathy developed an in situ (Stage 0) melanoma on her cheek. It was removed promptly, again with clean margins.

In December of 2009, Cathy experienced an episode of slurred speech prompting Mike to take her to the local emergency room. On December 15th, 2009, Cathy was diagnosed with malignant melanoma that had metastasized to her brain, lung, adrenal gland and bones. She endured a battery of treatments, including Gamma Knife surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Throughout her brief and brutal battle, Cathy chronicled her story with infinite humor and grace on the Caring Bridge website. Cathy inspired countless friends, family and fans to stand with her in solidarity as TEAM CATHY. From her wheelchair, Cathy led her team in the Ann’s Hope Foundation Block Melanoma 5K Run & 3K Walk on May 16, 2010. With her signature strength and winning smile, Cath left her wheelchair to cross the finish line on foot to a thunderous ovation. Cathy died on June 11, 2010, with her dear children, husband, parents, brothers, sister and in-laws close at hand.

Cathy’s life was far too short but its impact upon all who were blessed to know her is truly immeasurable. We miss her beyond expression, but we hold fast to her beauty, her feisty spirit, her deep faith and above all, her goodness. In loving memory of our Cathy, we are committed to raising awareness of the deadly consequences of melanoma and to supporting programs to defeat it. WE ARE TEAM CATHY.
-The Stephan & Gravelle families
Forever Team Cathy!

2011 Memorials

Richard Keyel • September 1952 – July 2011

Dick Keyel grew up in upstate New York, and always loved nature. He studied biology at SUNY-Albany, where he met his wife, Sally. He attended Cornell University and received a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, with a concentration in Entomology. After working for 23 years in Racine as an urban entomologist, he moved to Sun Prairie. In Madison, he continued researching insects, developing baits for ants, cockroaches and yellowjackets.

He instilled a love of nature into all three of his sons. It started out with quizzes on scientific orders of insects to birding along Lake Michigan. Soon they were birding all around the state and even taking trips across the US. After moving to Sun Prairie, Dick became more and more involved with the Madison Audubon Society’s prairie restoration efforts. He wanted to make a lasting impact on the local ecosystem by helping with controlled burns, collecting and planting native prairie seeds.

A year and a half ago, a lump started growing on his back, next to a non-cancerous cyst. He thought it was just another cyst, but it was red and ulcerated. When he finally went to a doctor, both cysts were removed. The new one was found to be malignant melanoma. After a wide-excision surgery and lymph node biopsy, a small spot was found in the lymph nodes under his left arm. He underwent another surgery, and recovered well. Dick opted not to have interferon treatments.

He was fine for several months and then a new spot started growing on his back in the same area. A PET-scan revealed more spots under his right arm. The first chemo treatment (temozolomide) didn’t work, and the tumors kept growing. He entered an experimental study under Dr. Albertini, and it worked very well for almost 7 weeks; then the tumors started growing again. Since Yervoy wasn’t available yet, he had Interleuken-2 treatments. Unfortunately, they couldn’t stop the growth. He died at home, surrounded by his family in July 2011. Experimental research in melanoma is so very important to finding a cure.

Cathy was kind and generous and simply could not wait to contribute! It was always her pleasure to extend a helping hand to her school, her friends, her church and her neighbors. Cathy’s desire to share her gifts occasionally exceeded her capacity to produce. One could often find Cath up late at night, frosting cupcakes, tying bows or planning her next project; always with her signature special touches. Our crafty Cathy enjoyed personalizing stationary, baby announcements and holiday cards by hand. She loved to ponder paint and fabric samples when decorating her home. She joyfully ‘decked the halls’ of her home for every major (and some not-so-major) holiday! She led the children in all manner of craft projects (often inviting neighborhood children to her impromptu ‘craft-camp’). She volunteered at school and in her community. Cathy’s love for her family, her commitment to her Catholic faith and her joi de vivre was evident and contagious. She was an absolute delight.

In 2001, Cathy’s dermatologist noticed a new and different-looking mole on her back. After learning it was a single-spreading malignant melanoma, she had it removed via wide excision and was pleased to learn that the margins had been “clean”. Afterward, Cathy visited her oncologist and underwent chest x-rays routinely. Six years later, in 2007, Cathy developed an in situ (Stage 0) melanoma on her cheek. It was removed promptly, again with clean margins.

In December of 2009, Cathy experienced an episode of slurred speech prompting Mike to take her to the local emergency room. On December 15th, 2009, Cathy was diagnosed with malignant melanoma that had metastasized to her brain, lung, adrenal gland and bones. She endured a battery of treatments, including Gamma Knife surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Throughout her brief and brutal battle, Cathy chronicled her story with infinite humor and grace on the Caring Bridge website. Cathy inspired countless friends, family and fans to stand with her in solidarity as TEAM CATHY. From her wheelchair, Cathy led her team in the Ann’s Hope Foundation Block Melanoma 5K Run & 3K Walk on May 16, 2010. With her signature strength and winning smile, Cath left her wheelchair to cross the finish line on foot to a thunderous ovation. Cathy died on June 11, 2010, with her dear children, husband, parents, brothers, sister and in-laws close at hand.

Cathy’s life was far too short but its impact upon all who were blessed to know her is truly immeasurable. We miss her beyond expression, but we hold fast to her beauty, her feisty spirit, her deep faith and above all, her goodness. In loving memory of our Cathy, we are committed to raising awareness of the deadly consequences of melanoma and to supporting programs to defeat it. WE ARE TEAM CATHY.
-The Stephan & Gravelle families
Forever Team Cathy!

2011 Memorials

Sam Recht • 1936 – April 8, 2010

Over a year has passed since Sam Recht, husband, father, grandfather, and uncle died from the devastating effects of his melanoma. Sam was born in Milwaukee in 1936 to immigrant parents. His sister and brother were born in Argentina. After graduating from North Division High School, Sam followed them to the University of Wisconsin, where he graduated number one in his law school class. After clerking for Judge F. Ryan Duffy in the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Sam joined the law firm of Brady, Tyrrell and Bruce. Through various mergers, the firm is now Quarles and Brady. Sam practiced law with the firm for over 43 years until he retired in 2004. His practice consisted of real estate law, corporate trial law, and counsel to the Milwaukee Bucks for 25 years. As important as his accomplishments as a lawyer, Sam was sought out by friends and relatives for his sage advice and unbiased judgment.

Described by his professional colleagues as “brilliant,” “distinguished,” “decent,” and “fair,” these words could similarly be applied to his family life. Married to Toby in 1959, three children were born: Jill in 1960, Michael in 1963, and Todd in 1966. Sam and Toby’s children were lucky to be raised amongst many cousins on both sides of the family. The extended family spent all holidays, birthdays and significant events together. At times, especially during the summers, it didn’t matter where a particular child landed for the night, as long as they were safe at some family member’s home. With Sam’s and Toby’s encouragement, all of their children went away for college and eventually moved to different parts of the country. Jill and James live in Colorado. They have twins Anna and Jessica. Michael and Ann live in Oregon with Olivia and Gracie. Todd and Phillip live in Philadelphia.

Within months of his retirement, Sam was diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma. After undergoing amputation of his toe and a lymph node resection, Sam received a year of therapy under the care of Dr. Mark Albertini at University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison. When his melanoma recurred, Sam participated in three phase 1 trial under the direction of Dr. Svetamir Marcovic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Throughout his various therapies, Dr. Jonathan Treisman at Aurora St. Luke’s was Sam’s consulting physician in Milwaukee.

Sam’s family would like to thank all the doctors, nurses, technicians and staff involved in his almost five years of therapy. Throughout, Sam and Toby were treated humanely and with dignity. During his therapy, Sam continued to attend Buck’s games and golf, a testament to the remarkable care provided by all of Sam’s team. Sam passed away on April 8, 2010. He understood them importance of ongoing research in the field of melanoma and would want continued support until a cure can be found.

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